Home Sweet Home

Home Sweet Home

Home Sweet Home


I have two great friends who take amazing photographs, especially of wildlife. My woodburning of a Chickadee is based on one of their photographs. I love making photos of flowers so it was a great treat when they asked me to make this piece of pyrography. Both the hibiscus and hummingbird are iconic to Trinidad and Tobago.

The challenge in the woodburning was to convey the delicate nature of the bird and flower in a medium like pyrography that emphasizes hard contrast. Oil color was used sparingly to add a little punch.

I’m always a little nervous when presenting a commission for the first viewing, but the reaction was welcome, much like the message on the plaque. Thanks Apryl and Anton!

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Togo

Togo

Togo – Pyrography on pine. 7 x 7″

This wood burning represents, in a way, the end of the road for Cowboy Country TV. We were working on the seventh season and there were strong signs that the show wouldn’t be back (due to network restructuring, not popularity; broadcast TV can be weird that way). I’d already done some pyrography for promo items and thought I’d make a thank you for the show’s creator, Dean Langille.

Togo was Dean’s Horse. He had a picture on the wall. I never got to meet Togo, but the photo showed a spark in the eye that I wanted to capture. The finished woodburning went over well and represents a memorial to the animal and the series that was a wonderful ride.

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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A little Wildlife, A Little Color

Squirrel in Tree

Squirrel in Tree – Pyrography on pine with Oil Colour. 5 x 7″


Canada Goose

Canada Goose – Pyrography on pine with oil colour. 5 x 7″


Chickadee

Chickadee – Pyrography on pine with oil colour. 5 x 7″

Part of the charm and allure of Pyrography is the sepia quality it creates. But sometimes a little color helps punch up the composition, draw the eye in. These woodburnings represent some of my first uses of pigment in my pyrography.

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Angels

Angels

Angels – Pyrography on pine. 12 x 9″

Angel Tray

Angel Tray – Pyrography on veneer. 16 X 10″


I love the contrast of taking the delicate image of an Angel and setting it on fire! I don’t mean that in any sort of blasphemous way, instead I see it as a challenge to unite two things you wouldn’t naturally associate. These woodburnings demonstrate my attempts at taking a softer, more lovable approach to my pyrography.

I used photos of statues as reference. This was helpful because the sculpture already had to be chiseled in and I could get a good idea of what lighting and shadows would do, making it easier for me to decide how much or little to burn.

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Cowboy Flourishes

Cowboy Flourishes

Cowboy Flourishes – Pyrography on pine. 5 x 7″


I love burning knots and patterns and flourishes. Western culture and fashion feature them prominently and I’ve found that on various commissioned projects they’re always a welcome touch.

The central composition of this wood burning actually was the quickest part to finish. Working from photo reference on a smallish surface I find the most difficult decision is often deciding what not to burn.

Making the patterns and etching on the edges can be a time consuming pyrographic process, but also therapeutic. I’ve spent hours and hours patiently notching in marks and twisting in flourishes, usually with music or an interesting documentary on as background accompaniment.

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Bison and Bark

Alberta Bison

Alberta Bison – Pyrography on basswood. 14 x 11″


Behold the ruler of the plains. History tells us of a time when herds of Bison covered the prairies like a blanket. Having met a few of these huge mammals up close I can’t help but think that would be a tad intimidating. There’s something powerful and almost noble about their stance so I decided to capture the likeness of one in a wood burning.

By the way, bison make a delicious burger. So much for nobility!

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Big Horn


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Pyrography on pine. 9 x 7

Driving through the Rocky Mountains it’s pretty easy to get a look at a Big Horn Sheep. I’ve mostly seen them in spring and early summer, licking the salt on the side of the road and looking a little mangy in the process of shedding their winter coat.

For this wood burning I wanted to capture a more noble look to the animal and add an air of history and wisdom. The pyrography has a textured quality with grooves and contours etched into the pine. I added some white oil color for dramatic effect and punch.

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Bailey

Bailey

Bailey – Pyrography with oil colour on basswood. 12 x 16″


A Commissioned woodburning in memory of Man’s Best Friend. If you’ve taken a look at my pyrography gallery you’ll know that I like to make pictures of animals. Discovering personality and quirks in other living beings and translating them into my art is a joy. Capturing the spirit of a family pet that is no longer with us is a privilege.

I never got to meet Bailey, but the reference photos showed a happy looking pooch with a sparkle in his eye.

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Wolves

Bark at the Moon

Bark at the Moon

Wolf Running

Wolf Running

Wolves

Wolves

I don’t believe my last name has anything to do with my fascination with wolves. They’re just mysterious, amazing and beautiful animals. Other than at a zoo, I’ve never been close enough to a real one to get a good look so I really on photo reference to know what’s where in order to make a wood burning come to life.

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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Long Ride Home

Long Ride Home

Long Ride Home – Pyrography with oil colour on basswood. 16 x 12


Working on the TV series Cowboy Country had a strong influence on my wood burning. Part of the show profiled several Western artists and told their stories. While much of the artwork is amazing I think I was most influenced by the passion and spirit of the Artists.

In terms of composition, my goal for Long Ride Home was to depict a scene that spoke of nostalgia and work ethic. I chose to use oil color more prominently than usual because I wanted the warmer colour to liven up the wood burning. Yes, it was a hot dusty day, but at least the sun is out!

To see more of Chris Wulff’s art and design visit uberdoodles.com.

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